11 July, 2010

Clergy; sex abuse: Lawyer wants pope's testimony in Oregon abuse case - latimes.com

Clergy; sex abuse: Lawyer wants pope's testimony in Oregon abuse case - latimes.com

8 comments:

  1. "The Vatican, in their view, sets religious policy for the worldwide church but is not involved in day-to-day operations of its far-flung parishes and bears no legal responsibility for abusive priests."

    Tricky. And dangerous. Because...either responsible or not responsible, but for the whole of it, no cherry-picking. Pick one. The buck has to stop somewhere, or the currency gets devalued completely.

    "The idea of suing the pope or the Vatican over sexual abuse by priests in the United States, he said, makes no more sense than suing President Obama in a case of abuse by a public school teacher in California."

    Bad, bad analogy. School teachers are not under federal jurisdiction. But you can bet your last dime that if a school board failed to act on a criminal teacher, the governor would either step in or get dumped in the next election! The difference here, of course, is that the school boards actually do their jobs when it comes to criminal activity among teachers.

    "Responding to a demand that the pope and his secretary of state testify in the Kentucky case, Lena said that both men are entitled to 'absolute civil and criminal immunity' as heads of state and government."

    That comes awfully close to sounding like an admission of guilt while crowing that there's nothing anyone can do about it. That's why I said it was dangerous.

    "The Vatican has fought the latest legal onslaughts — and will continue to do so as the cases move toward trial — by claiming that priests and bishops in the United States are not employees of the Vatican but work instead for their local diocese or order."

    Chain of command. Anyone with any military experience knows what that is. Ultimately, Vatican is either going to have to take responsibility or give up command.

    Has the Vatican ever heard of the crime of lèse majesté?

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  2. Anonymous12 July, 2010

    If your sibling or your child committed a murder, would you be charged as well?

    ReplyDelete
  3. Good post Lady Janus. A lot of good thinking in it.

    Lina

    ReplyDelete
  4. "Anonymous said: If your sibling or your child committed a murder, would you be charged as well?"

    If that sibling or child (I gather you are talking about adults not about 5yr.olds). If these adults knew about, yes!

    Anonymous...you have a soft spot for the Roman Catholic Church Hierarchy? I have no problem with that. Nevertheless, in my opinion your question tells me you may be using it as a DEFLECTING (trick) question.

    Numerous Catholics have this passive aggressiveness trait in them because of all the bad press the Catholic Church is getting. These Catholics (some with good intentions)like to stay in the mindset to use tactics to remain in denial, to distort, to deflect & remain in defiance even if all the facts points to the Roman Catholic Church's hierarchy accountability in the responsibility department.


    Lina

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  5. If I helped said sibling or child in any way -- including refusing to cooperate with a criminal investigation -- yes.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Anonymous13 July, 2010

    "Bad, bad analogy. School teachers are not under federal jurisdiction."

    Correct, school teachers are not under federal jurisdiction but neither is a priest under the direct authority of the Pope. I believe he answers to his Bishop who answers to his arch bishop who answers to his cardinal who answers to the pope, so the analogy stands.


    "But you can bet your last dime that if a school board failed to act on a criminal teacher, the governor would either step in or get dumped in the next election! The difference here, of course, is that the school boards actually do their jobs when it comes to criminal activity among teachers."

    Oh really?

    "The American Medical Association found in 1986 that one in four girls, and one in eight boys, are sexually abused in or out of school before the age of 18. Two years later, a study included in The Handbook on Sexual Abuse of Children, reported that one in four girls, and one in six boys, is sexually abused by age 18.[xxix] It was reported in 1991 that 17.7 percent of males who graduated from high school, and 82.2 percent of females, reported sexual harassment by faculty or staff during their years in school. Fully 13.5 percent said they had sexual intercourse with their teacher.

    In New York City alone, at least one child is sexually abused by a school employee every day. One study concluded that more than 60 percent of employees accused of sexual abuse in the New York City schools were transferred to desk jobs at district offices located inside the schools. Most of these teachers are tenured and 40 percent of those transferred are repeat offenders. They call it “passing the garbage” in the schools. One reason why this exists is due to efforts by the United Federation of Teachers to protect teachers at the expense of children. Another is the fact that teachers accused of sexual misconduct cannot be fired under New York State law.

    One of the nation’s foremost authorities on the subject of the sexual abuse of minors in public schools is Hofstra University professor Charol Shakeshaft. In 1994, Shakeshaft and Audrey Cohan did a study of 225 cases of educator sexual abuse in New York City. Their findings are astounding.

    All of the accused admitted sexual abuse of a student, but none of the abusers was reported to the authorities, and only 1 percent lost their license to teach. Only 35 percent suffered negative consequences of any kind, and 39 percent chose to leave their school district, most with positive recommendations. Some were even given an early retirement package.

    Moving molesting teachers from school district to school district is a common phenomenon. And in only 1 percent of the cases do superintendents notify the new school district. According to Diana Jean Schemo, the term “passing the trash” is the preferred jargon among educators.

    Shakeshaft has also determined that 15 percent of all students have experienced some kind of sexual misconduct by a teacher between kindergarten and 12th grade; the behaviors range from touching to forced penetration. She and Cohan also found that up to 5 percent of teachers sexually abuse children.

    Cheers
    Paul

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  7. "I believe he answers to his Bishop who answers to his arch bishop who answers to his cardinal who answers to the pope, so the analogy stands."

    It falls down. A lot. No teacher can ever be chain-linked to the president. But you just proved my point about chain of command, thanks!

    "One reason why this exists is due to efforts by the United Federation of Teachers to protect teachers at the expense of children. Another is the fact that teachers accused of sexual misconduct cannot be fired under New York State law."

    Then you need to go after both the UFT and the NY law. Get them out of the way and let the courts have the offenders.

    But other than that, "passing the trash" seems to be a well-known phenomenon. Where are the prosecutors? Why are they not doing their jobs?

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  8. This John Mac Donald's take about abuse victims not trusting the Church in dealing with their cases.

    Can anyone spell conflict?

    C hurch
    O fficials
    N ever
    F ollow the
    L aw and
    I mplicitly
    C annot be
    T rusted

    This is taken from Fr. Tim's favorite links:# Sylvia's Website: Canadian Clergy Sex Abuse Cases
    ------------------------------------

    This using of a word like CONFLICT what this man did to make a valid point reminds me of another.

    I do not know who the person was but it was with the word BIBLE. I thought it was clever.
    I know, it does not take much to amaze me. (smiling)

    Can anyone spell BIBLE?

    B asic
    I instruction
    B efore
    L eaving
    E arth


    Lina

    ReplyDelete

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